Posts Tagged ‘blurb’

Falling Angels by Jen Winters

Falling Angels by Jen Winters

Hey guys!
Today we have something very special going on. We have the privilege to reveal the cover for Jen Winters next novel, Falling Angels.
If you haven’t read the first in the series, Kissing Demons, you can do so by clicking here or click on the image of the new cover above. It has an Amazon.com rating of 4.2 stars! The reviews are definitely worth checking out!
The wonderful and talented Julie Nicholls is Jen’s cover artist and she can be contacted through Facebook or you can email her to request that she works her magic for you too.
So on to the good stuff 🙂 the book, Falling Angels, will be released on the 17th of June, so mark that day in your calendar! And here’s what you have to look forward to:

What’s worse than losing your job? How about losing your life, your home, and everything familiar? I just wanted to work. What did I get in return? A long fucking fall with a sudden stop.
Stranded on earth with little hope for survival and an eternity of banishment ahead of me, I did the only thing I knew—I worked the jobs I could. Until I realized I’d been replaced. Then I got mad.
Eleven thousand years of fighting for my destiny had me broken, bitter, and ready to just give up. And then my best friend blew up Fort Worth and screwed the entire universe in the process. Now I have to save his ass from everyone including the Guardians.
I hate Guardians—those intrusive vixens replaced me, took over my job, and left me utterly useless. But this one, Lavinia, she’s almost as old as I am and she is starting to get under my skin. I can’t concentrate when she’s around—everything about her mystifies me and why the hell do I remember her from before? She shouldn’t even exist! And certainly not in my memory.

Want to know a little more about Jen? Here’s her bio:

Jen Winters fell in love with paranormal romance after her daughter was born and she needed a way to escape reality for a few minutes a day. She loved it so much she decided to take her own pen to it. The world of the Guardians was developed through deeply irreligious conversations with her father who likes to misinterpret scripture as often as humanly possible and a good dose of did-I-just-read-that-! when looking into ancient near eastern mythology and scripture.

Clearly she’s a gal who knows her stuff! More can be found on Jen’s blog and she’s on Facebook too.

This is one not to be missed guys. I own her other works and you’ll want to check those out too. Jen is a great girl with a big heart and she’s going to be an author to watch. So everyone mark June 17 in your diary and pick up Falling Angels as soon as humanly possible!

Good luck on your adventures,

xSx

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What’s the most important part of any fiction novel? The genre? Location? Style? Maybe the premise? Not in my opinion. In my opinion, the most important part of every fiction novel is: the characters.
If we care about the characters, if we connect with them, then the other aspects merely compliment and enhance these people who we are on a journey with.
From an authors point of view, we have to be willing to spend an awful lot of time with these people, months, sometimes years, getting to know them. While we work with them, they are our best friends, our lovers, and our allies. They are our colleagues and they are our family. They are us and we are them.
So, let’s start with nothing. Try to recall how you feel before you open a book, when you’ve maybe read the blurb but really don’t know anything about who is in the book or what they’re going to go through, when you’re completely clueless. Then think about your last book hangover, when you really didn’t want to close the book because then you knew it was going to be over. When you didn’t want to put it down. When you cared so much about these characters that you couldn’t get them out of your head for days and lay awake at night thinking about them. Quite a transition, isn’t it?
We rarely fixate on the location or even the specific storyline of a book for too long. The characters are what linger with us. As humans, the psychic connection is crucial. In real life, there’s not always a physical reason for you to care for someone, but we still do care about them.
Developing this kind of connection between reader and character is very important in ensuring the most satisfying reading experience.
So, how do we create a character? For the most part physical attributes aren’t really very important, they are window dressing. Sometimes a vision of a character will be what first appears, but the look of a character isn’t what makes them complete. We don’t connect because we know someone is six foot tall and has blue eyes.
To write a character that readers can connect with you have to understand the essence of them. You have to be able to live in their head and understand their motivations, their actions, and their mannerisms etc. Why do they use certain words? What are their habits and ambitions? It’s not enough to keep a bio, to have a list of facts about upbringing and environment. We can’t simply list their CV, likes and dislikes, and think that a collection of facts will bring about a relationship between reader and character.
All of us are flawed and so characters have to be flawed too. They are not perfect. They are not (depending on the genre) omnipotent and can’t necessarily read the mind of a person who may be hurting, or be able to see danger coming from around the corner. Characters have to be thrown off-guard and out of their comfort zone, when we as readers understand that they are mentally or emotionally struggling but they battle on then we start to root for them.
But it starts with a link. The writer has to be linked to the character, we have to be able to live in their head and have them inhabit ours. Imagining how they would react in even the most mundane of circumstances helps with that, talking to them, writing scenes that will never make the book, all of these things help to develop a trust and understanding between character and reader, because it’s only when the author cares about the character that the reader will too.
This goes for the villains too. Care doesn’t have to be tender. You have to understand the motivations, and the history, of your antagonist as well as you do for the protagonist, it gives the relationship between those characters balance.
The writer, and the reader, should always remember that these characters are only given life when they are experienced and remembered. They can only feel if you feel. You are their heartbeat and their soul inhabits yours. Take a piece of your favourite characters with you wherever they go – they’ll appreciate the adventure.

Good luck on your adventures,

xSx

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Success is a relative term that we all have to define for ourselves. When I started my publishing journey I had to learn about a lot of new things that I hadn’t considered before. Ironically, the easiest part of this whole process is the writing! Yes, that’s the part I find myself retreating to when the rest of this experience becomes too much.
Has my writing style and process changed since I released my first novel? Yes. You have to let it be organic. Every new experience adjusts our perspective, so our writing will always adjust to compensate.
But what I didn’t do was make a concrete assertion of what “success” would look like. I suppose we all have a vague idea of what it would look like to achieve our dreams. But when you start on the path to try and realise your ambition the whole thing takes on a new configuration.
I’m not actually here to talk about writing, but as I previously stated, writing is my go to place when I’m struggling elsewhere. So why am I here? I’m not really sure, to be honest. I sat staring at the empty post for a while… and that’s not like me. I’m one of these strange people who love the white, blank page. It doesn’t intimidate me, it excites me, because it lies there ready to absorb the adventure, to record the comedy and drama woven in the words.
But I sat and I stared… I could write about writing. I could write about publishing. I could write about process. I could talk about opinion. Today, I’m vexed by a challenge that I can’t overcome. I can’t think my way out of it. I can’t write my way out of it. With those two avenues exhausted I sit and I stare.
I can write full-length romantic fiction. I can publish novels in various digital formats and in paperback. I can create and maintain websites. I can blog. I can interact on social media. Other than the first, these are all things that I’ve had to learn since I started this publishing journey. What can’t I do? Find a way to encourage readers to engage with me as a writer.
I don’t know if it’s me. I don’t know if it’s my novels. But no matter how much I talk to and question people, and generally try to encourage dialogue, readers are reluctant. Why is that?
So I do what any sane person would do, I consult the plan for achieving my goal… hmm… What does success look like? Goals in writing can be severely narrowed… “I must edit this many chapters this week…” “I must reach this word count.” “I must write the blurb, description, design a cover…” “Come up with a character name…” the list is endless. But because it can be divided into so many segments it’s easy to focus on each task and ignore the big picture.
At first it’s just a wonder to see your book on Amazon! Then it’s amazing to see the red line on your sales dashboard graph move at all. All of these little feats become cause for celebration. Mastering the tasks in themselves can feel like climbing mountains and reaching summits. What do you do when you’re over the mound of learning, and comfortable enough in the process, then realise that you’re lacking?
You try to find a task to complete… but there isn’t one. You can’t achieve a task toward a goal when you don’t know what success looks like. I do wonder how other indies measure their success, is it in sales? Maybe its in monetary terms? Or maybe it’s the number of dedicated fans that they have?
Success is relative, but I still don’t know where it stands in relation to me… could it be hiding around the next corner? But if you’re standing on the road alone, when is it time to accept that you’ve taken a wrong turn?

Good luck on your adventures,

Scarlett

Explicit Instruction

It’s out, Explicit Instruction is now available on Amazon. Please buy it and review it if you like. It’s published, I’ve told everyone I know, and I’ve conveyed that message through all of my online channels.
Now that is out the way there’s only one question left to answer. What’s next?
I’m in that limbo phase now. As a writer there are always ideas crowding out my thoughts. One character, a scene, a line of dialogue that my sub-conscious wants to prioritise. It takes discipline and perseverance to write and thus moving through the phases of writing requires focus.
The phase I’m in now I like to think of as my “resting” phase. That doesn’t mean I’m doing nothing, because I am. What it means is that I’m between the fury of projects. Tunnel vision is common amongst us writers… or indeed any of us creative types. I can be consumed by a draft, or an edit, or the peripheral elements required in publishing – cover design, blurb, description, etc. Right now I’m not consumed. Being consumed means living and breathing the work, getting up at the crack of dawn and writing until you can’t sit up anymore. But it doesn’t mean I’m any less enthralled.
My next project is going to be the Mistake Me Not sequel. It’s written but I have decided to rework a section so I’ll plough into the editing to get it restructured. I’ve started already and am well on my way to getting the first re-draft together. I’ve done that while sorting the necessary parts of Explicit Instruction out and so I almost haven’t realised how much I’ve done! :p
My head is buzzing with another idea that’s desperately trying to take hold, it’s trying to claw the MMN aside to gain my focus but I’m fighting against it. The MMN sequel was written long before Explicit Instruction took over and if I let this other idea consume me MMN will be deferred again.
But the sequel is written. Luckily I’m working with a cover designer already for the sequel so a September launch looks secure at this time… providing I don’t change my mind again!
I haven’t yet decided if I’m going to continue the Mistake novels after this sequel. I do have an outline written and researched for my favourite Stone man – can you guess which it is? 😛 It’s certainly not pressing. I might let this other idea crowd in. But I got a review for Explicit Instruction today on Amazon.com – not bad for launch day – that called for a sequel of Rushe and Flick’s story! Rushe is quite a hero! But it’s only launch day, we’ll see if it sticks. In the meantime…

Sneaky Snippet

‘My boyfriend’s a bodyguard,’ Lacie said. ‘Sorcha got it right. How many ways do you know how to kill a person?’
‘One’s enough,’ Ryder said. ‘But I believe in variety.’
Lacie leaned in close. ‘I know. I share a bed with you.’

Good luck on your adventures,

xSx

question

I’m supposed to keep these short so I have no idea what I was thinking last night. Ignore that, let’s do this instead. I’ve been playing around with the description for Explicit Instruction and no doubt it will look completely different when I’m through but tell me what you think:

Flick tried to run but it was already too late. In the clutches of evil she seems doomed to her petrifying fate; all of her screaming and begging doesn’t change a thing. Then the door of her would-be tomb is opened and the evil stops in its tracks. The silhouette isn’t like the others but that doesn’t make him any less dangerous, although he quickly becomes her only hope.
Stolen away, Flick has to rely on Rushe’s instincts to keep her alive. But rescuing her saviour from his own demise changes things… or does it?
Flick entrusts her life to Rushe, but he still cannot bring himself to stand down from red-alert. There’s more going on here than Flick understands and Rushe has no intention of telling her any of the details.
Rushe sends Flick away, saving her life, but severing their link. Flick goes back to her life believing that she’ll never see her protector again. Until a stranger walks into her workplace and tells her that Rushe is in trouble and Flick has the power to help him.
The adventure she started by accident threatens her life and his, then Rushe does something she had never expected and Flick knows it’s not only her life she’d battling for, it’s her heart as well.

xSx