Posts Tagged ‘publishing’

hurts
I don’t often reveal much of my personal life. Please don’t be offended by this, I was raised to believe that showing any of your vulnerable underbelly was a weakness should be avoided at all costs. My family taught me that I had nothing of value to say and that none of my emotions were valid.
Perhaps this is why I ensconced myself in books. In their worlds I got to see what it was to have a parent who asked a child about their day or hugged them, something that I didn’t get at home. Fiction was a safe place where anything could happen because it was pure fantasy.
As embarrassing as this is to admit, it’s only really been in the last few years that I’ve realised some people out there do reveal themselves to others. Sadly, I have been conditioned for three decades and so my learned behaviours are fully engrained; opening myself to anyone in person won’t be happening any time soon.
Please don’t feel sorry for me, or laugh, at how pathetic my upbringing was. My father left when I was a child and I lived in a cold environment with my mother where feelings, or discussions of them, were bothersome. You do what needs to be done and that’s it. You get up in the morning, go to work, eat and sleep – that’s about it. There is nothing more to life. At least that’s what I spent my childhood believing.
All of my pitiful ramblings above are the prelude to how I feel this evening, which is why I am chattering. Sometimes I do feel alone. Being estranged from my parents was nothing in my youth when I had a million friends (rather superficial acquaintances) and a frantic social life. But I don’t have that mask disguising the truth anymore.
As luck would have it – or not – when I did find a man to settle down with it turned out that man was an abusive alcoholic who thought only of himself and not of me or our child. Eventually I freed myself from him and now I have a lot to be proud of in my life. My son is smart and beautiful and keeps me going every day. I built a business that I run from home so that I can be there for my son when I need to be and never miss a school show – even if it means working until the early hours when he is asleep.
Writing has been in my life since I was a child, as I said before it offered me an escape and let me explore the emotions I felt but was not allowed to express. But it was my grandmother’s death that prompted me to publish. The woman was a tower of strength, the most incredible person that I have ever known, and one who would give her last to those in need. I’ll admit that she was from a different generation and wasn’t exactly the tactile, warm and fuzzy type, but she cared for my sister and me in a way that no one else ever did and she never made us feel like a burden.
Through the years I have loved and lost in relationships of the romantic and platonic variety. I’ve stood up in courts to defend what is right, even when it broke my heart. What family I did have left I lost when I defended my niece and nephew against the only sister I have, in order to prevent them being subjected to her abuse.
I’ve proved to myself that I have integrity and I have proved that I can, and will, work hard and do what it takes to care for the children whom I love so much. I imagine sometimes that my grandmother watches over them, as she watched over us, and that I have to do for her what she no longer can, because she is not on this earth with us anymore.
But it’s hard, oh god, it’s hard. Tonight I’m feeling blue, as you may have guessed. Having struggled all of my life with depression and anxiety issues I recognise that this will pass, sometimes life slaps you down just to remind you of the strength it takes to stand back up.
Why do I bother? No one in my real life knows that I publish. I was taught to never expose my emotions or inner thoughts, and there isn’t a place more personal or revealing than the words I put onto paper. No one would understand. If they read and saw just what went on within me I’d never be able to look them in the eye again. I’d be embarrassed and ashamed, not because of the explicit content of my novels, but because then they would know that I feel.
But when no one in your real life knows that you publish and you have no one to share your frustrations and triumphs with online either the whole experience becomes so isolating. There’s no one there to say, “Wow, look what you did…” Only writers know how many hours (see months and years) it takes to hone your craft enough to publish. Only writers know how invested we become in our characters and their worlds, and how much of yourself you pour into them.
Spending all of that time writing is one thing. But to publish is a whole other ballgame. You have to learn how to make covers, write your own blurbs, and fill out acknowledgements. Believe it or not, those are the fun parts. Learning the ins and outs of formatting was fun (not) and each platform has its own rules, so getting the hang of KDP means nothing when you head over to Smashwords.
KDP, there’s a laugh. You think you know what that’s about? No one does. And they keep moving the goal posts. Should you give Amazon exclusivity and enter KDP Select? What the hell is KDP Select? Right, ok, so I can’t publish elsewhere and they let me choose promotions from either free days or Kindle Countdown Deals… wait, what? What the hell is Kindle Countdown and do I want it? Ok, pick your dates and how many increments, and fill out all the—pop-up box, “Your book must have been…” and there’s a list, the same price for thirty days, and then you can’t change the price for two weeks after it’s done and… forget it, let’s go with the free days.
I could write a novel on my experience of self-publishing alone. I can’t even count the number of hours I’ve spent reading blogs and Googling terms I’ve never heard of before in my life.
Learning how to publish is a steep curve, but the promotion racket is worse! Then you have to build a website, make teasers and banners, and adverts. You have to run all your own social media, even when you know no one, and have no clue what you’re doing. You sign up for everything that’s going, and never use half of it again, but you sign up anyway.
After all those hours writing the book, formatting and publishing the book, then promoting (making a nuisance of yourself everywhere) the book – all the while wearing your cheery, plastic smile – you look up and realise… it all means absolutely nothing and has gotten you nowhere.
The truth is, the world is too big. It doesn’t matter if you write the best novel in the universe, if you can’t get it out there then no one will ever see it. For the girl who was taught that every time she opened her mouth and uttered a word she was an irritation, it’s very difficult. I am proud that I’ve worked hard and learned so much. I am a grown woman. So why do I still feel that I should apologise for existing?
“This too in time shall pass…”
“Ours is not to wonder why…”
The clichés mount up until you find yourself sitting in the dark at four in the morning wondering why on earth you bother. No one can take writing away from me, but why do I work so hard to do the best I can? I can’t answer that.
I’m a strong person, but I’m not a social person, I’m an observer. I was sent here to watch the world, not to participate in it. I love to watch and to wonder. The trouble is, I’ve spent so many years learning to be invisible that now I’m in a situation where I want to be seen, I don’t have the first clue how to do it.
Anyway, sorry for taking up your time. I’m sure that most won’t get this far in my blether and I’m sure that I’ll be embarrassed tomorrow for writing this. But getting it out there, freeing these words, somehow makes me feel less alone. So thank you, it might be feeble and pathetic, but gratitude is all that I have left.

Good luck on your adventures,

xSx

stars

putting-puzzle-pieces-together

So it turns out that there’s an issue for indies that few people talk about. Here it is: there’s a difference between folks buying your book and actually reading it.
Obviously the fact that people buy your novel is a great compliment and that’s not something to be sniffed at. But we all have such busy lives and such long TBR lists that it’s impossible to imagine ever reaching the end of them, which means there’s a possibility that those readers will never read your book!
I too have a TBR list that makes my eyes water. When I look through my TBR list I get excited by all of the tales there ready, just waiting to be absorbed into my being. I know that I’ll love some of them and loathe others. I know some will inspire me in my own writing and others will inspire me on how not to write. But it’s thrilling to know that all of those stories and characters are there for me, waiting until I am ready… well the paperbacks anyway. I suppose Amazon can do what it likes with the Kindle reads :p
But how to choose, how to choose… deciding on what to read comes down to a number of factors for me. Though I’ve learned my factors often aren’t the same as others. I choose to read books that are unrelated (entirely) to anything I might be working on with my own writing at that moment. Sometimes that means a different genre or time period, other times it’s just a different location or setup. The worst thing about the TBR decision is the amount of time it takes to pick something to read. Think of all the words we could be experiencing in those minutes it takes us to make a decision.
Often when I’m trawling my TBR list I’ll go back to product pages to re-read descriptions or reviews, which can then lead me to other work by that author (or other authors) and often I’ll find myself increasing the length of my TBR list! Ahh!
I don’t take part in reading challenges because I face so many time challenges with my writing that I wouldn’t want to embroil myself in more. But I do admire those that do. It must be electrifying to have that goal and to be working towards completing a reading mission.
But, back to the original point… Indies spend an awful lot of time and energy writing books, we know this. They spend an awful lot of time and energy promoting books, we know this, too. But it turns out that there’s another hurdle we are completely powerless to overcome.
So how do we put the pieces together? How do we connect the reader to the novel? The answer is, we don’t. There’s such a thing as free will and we all have to accept that there comes a point where fate decides. You can’t force someone to do something which they do not want to do. You can try to make your work as interesting and enticing as you can and then after that, the Gods decide… or rather the reader does – haven’t I previously mentioned that you’re all-powerful? :p
A writer can do only one thing. Keep writing. Your book may languish for years in the e-reader of a potential five star reviewer, but there’s no way to know who that is. Push someone too hard and you’re more likely to find yourself at the one star end. Yes, it’s frustrating, and yes, it’s disheartening to know that your work is lying there unabsorbed. But when there are so many writing and publishing factors that you can influence this is not one to get stuck on.
Still, I make an appeal to all readers. Set a number, three or four, maybe ten or twelve, but pick a number of books to read on your TBR and vow to read that many at the start of each month before you buy any new books. Just think, your next favourite novel could have been on that TBR list all along waiting for you, it’s time to venture forth and discover it!

Good luck on your adventures,

xSx

questions-and-answers

 

So we had some questions put forth and it is my pleasure to be able to answer them. I’m always happy for anyone to get in touch with any queries that they have for me and if there are more after this then I am certainly willing to write another blog based on them. I can probably get hold of Rushe and Flick too if you have any questions for them 😉
But lets get cracking on today’s selection.

Question One
Who do you create first, the hero or heroine?

It largely depends on where inspiration comes from. Some novels begin with a character and others with scenarios. I don’t think it would be much of a surprise to learn that in the case of Explicit Instruction Rushe came to me first. The novel itself is actually about him, despite being from Flick’s point of view. Such a strong man with such clear characteristics was vivid from the outset. Everything else came from him, he dominates the piece.
But in other novels the heroine may come first, or even a secondary character. There have even been times when the couple came to me at the same time!


Question Two
Is it hard to come up with ideas/characteristics for non-typical romance Heroes (ie Rushe, Sloane)?

I have to be honest and say that non-typical heroes are actually my favourite kind. I don’t think it’s difficult to come up with the ideas for them and their traits but it can be more difficult to sell them to the reader. A lot of readers enjoy non-typical heroes, but there is still an expectation of how a hero should act towards his heroine. It’s extremely important for me that the respect remains intact between our couple, and as the writer it’s my job to ensure that the message of the relationship isn’t lost. Hence why consent is such an important factor for Rushe. Making that feature in his personality so prominent to the reader allowed me, the author, to communicate the maintained respect, despite the intense situation.

Question Three
Are any of your characters based on real people, or do they all come straight from your imagination?

Ah, I’ll have to be careful with this one! Yes, I have written characters based on real people.
Some of my characters share the odd trait here and there with people I know in real life, however the majority of my characters do come entirely from my imagination.
But, for those of you who have read The XY Factor you may remember Nick and Bella? They have their own novel, which is based before Sloan and Darcy’s. Their journey to happiness was bumpy too but an awful lot of fun. In their story there are two characters based on people in my life… I wonder if they’d recognise themselves…

I hope these answers have enlightened some of you. Please contact me with anymore questions you have, or head on over to Facebook and ask them there. Remember, if you don’t ask, you may never know!

Good luck on your adventures,

xSx

afirebook

 

Every author knows, or should know, that word of mouth is crucial to book sales. It’s crucial in all areas of sales, for any product or service, but it’s not easy to encourage. You can’t make it happen.
Most readers would assess the activity as a hobby. Very few readers would consider reading a passion to the point of addiction. Each group is as important as the other. Getting people talking about your work is the only thing that will spread interest to the point of great success.
So how do we address it? In my experience, we don’t. Though, I do think it’s a shame that so many readers don’t understand the power they wield. If you tell one friend about a book that you enjoyed, and ask them to tell them a friend if they enjoy it, and so on, pretty soon a wildfire will grow and you alone will have started a trend. You will have picked out the next success. You, the readers, can give great reach to a once unknown novel or author.
But, and this is a big but, readers are just as influential the other way. So authors must always remember that the reader is always right. If you try too hard to make conversations happen then you’re only likely to upset your audience.
I do think that if casual readers took more time discussing the books that they enjoyed there would be a more varied traditional market. In this time of austerity few big publishers are taking risks on lesser known authors or novels.
I don’t claim for one second to hold all the answers. No one can. But I do have concerns, as many do, about the state of the publishing industry at the moment. Almost every author you speak to will concede that there needs to be reformation of the way the big publishers, and retailers, do business. The trouble is, and please bear in mind that we’re a creative bunch, no one has come up with the solution.
My concern isn’t with regards to my writing career. Oddly enough I feel relatively secure as an indie knowing that I can control my process and output. But for all this talk of what colossal Governmental debt we’re leaving for our children, what a polluted and empty planet we are passing on to our grandchildren, can’t we at least secure their recreational needs? How can parents educate children on the pleasure of reading when all anyone wants is the latest gadget and the most explosive video game?
I’ve heard a lot of talk, especially recently, of how we need to change our political process, of how we need to be more willing to pull together to fix the problem instead of spending so much time in opposition, blaming each other for the issues. There are times when I feel the same way about industry, and about the publishing industry specifically.
Is it just because they can shout the loudest? Or because their pulpit is the highest? So many aspire to be taken on, to be under the wing of this protective dragon, who is out there to take on the world for us while we cower quietly in the folds of its wing, igniting our passion, so they can let it flourish.
They’re not out to protect us. No one is out to protect you. We live in a world where if you want something you have to go and get it for yourself. Don’t ever expect your dream to come true by sitting back and staring into the clouds. The world is beautiful. We have so much as individuals and as a society to give. So why do we spend so much time in opposition to each other?
There is no black and white. There are only shades of grey. So why can’t we accept that not everything is a matter of right or wrong? Not everything is as clear as good or bad? That cool and uncool are relative terms?
Life is filled with big decisions. Life is filled with difficult decisions. One day you may wake up and regret one of them. One decision can change everything about your life. It can change who you are. It can change who you become.
I always try to be as honest as I can, I share my opinions, but I try not to get too personal. Every single person reading this has a story. It’s a story in your heart. A story of your ideals. A story that maps the course from where you were to where you are. I can almost guarantee that when you reflect upon that story it won’t be the one you thought you’d be telling.
Are we who we thought we would be? When you were a child, or an adolescent, full of hope and imagination, what did you dream of?
It’s important to know, when you think of your former self, that you’re still there. That fire never went away. Your life might not be what you thought it would be. But the passion doesn’t have to leave you. The only tragedy would be containing that fire and not sharing it with the world.
So tomorrow, or today, tell your story… ok, maybe not all at once, but share something. Look into the eyes of another person and share your fire, then ask them to share their fire with you. Together we are powerful, we can move the lives of others. We can influence the future through our children. Standing in opposition should not be our default stance. Reach out.
Don’t let the fire die out, let it burn. Smile at the sky and remember that tomorrow is another page of your story, ready, open to be written. You will fill that white, blank page, and it will remain with you forever. Don’t forget to share it.

 

Good luck on your adventures,

 

xSx

shifte

I studied business at college. A large part of business is marketing, so is economics. Here it is.
Books, in most varieties, would be classified as an “elastic” product. What this means, in its simplest form, is that as the price goes up demand will go down. Books are a “luxury” item, you don’t have to buy them.
If the price of your favourite author’s next book suddenly jumped to $900 the chances are you’re not going to run out and buy it on launch day. Whereas if an author you’ve never heard of offers a book for $0.01 then you might be willing to give it a whirl.
We can all agree that supply of ebooks is covered from every angle. If you look at the market as a whole then we know there are choices abound. Even down to the individual author, we don’t have a problem supplying a specific book. The costs to produce are minimal. Time is the greatest factor in creating our product.
Fixed costs are likely covered by our personal bills, as are the variable costs. Again, the only exception to latter would be labour, but every author going in knows that time will be required and it is usually just our own. Further down the line there may be costs accrued for editors or cover designers, etc. but realistically you can’t claw that back by inflating the cost of your novel. You would need to project exactly how many you may sell and if you’re a new author that’s virtually impossible.
When you publish through Amazon they can chose to alter the price of your books without reason or notice, which makes it very difficult for us to control sales of our product. CreateSpace is just crazy because they dictate the minimum price your book can be sold for (which is always an extortionate rate) meaning that a lot of authors are lucky to make more than a couple of pennies for sales of paperbacks. It’s the author who is judged for setting a high price – but we didn’t!
So you’ve written your book, you’ve published it, you may have set up the paperback set up too. Then comes the next big task, promote your book!
I brought up the business thing because I spend a lot of time thinking about pricing, even though it’s sometimes outwith my control. I’ve witnessed the truth of my economics professor’s words on my KDP sales dashboard. I’ve watched the coloured lines go up and down. I’ve watched the royalties go up and down too.
I want to say here that I recently read a blog post about KU and whether or not the number of the books borrowed were added to sales figure, and as such influenced rankings. I can’t find the blog post again. But if there’s anyone out there who is interested, the answer is, no. The number of units borrowed in no way contributes to your book’s rank. I’ve worked it out. Sales alone dictate the rank.
If the economics theories are correct, the next focus is factors that affect demand. So I’m certainly looking forward to winter because summer is a bummer on book sales! Especially with the glorious weather we’ve been having, lol.
But because I have been considering pricing, and marketing strategies, I want to let all new authors in on a little secret. The vast majority of promotion opportunities out there don’t do squat for you. The price for some of these advertising campaigns is nothing short of daylight robbery. I’m still new to this publishing thing too, which is why I wanted to let you know not to part with your money. It really upsets me that websites claiming to make you the next big thing prey on those eager to carve out a writing career. It’s a passion but it can leave author’s open to being taken advantage of. There are some good sites out there with reasonably priced offerings, seek those out first!
But, I’ve gone and done it again with the rambling. I’ll try to pick up this thread again soon because I have lots of views on the promotion machine, and some personal experiences I’d like to share. For now…

Good luck on your adventures,

xSx

home-sweet-home

I’m home and blogging before I’m fully unpacked but what can I say? I missed my office.
I love coming home. It’s always a hassle with the washing and the re-stocking of cupboards, no doubt someone has left something behind and there are bills on the mat. But, I’m home.
I love to travel. I always have. It’s something I did much more in my younger days (pre-parenthood) but every time I travel in my home country I’m reminded of just how beautiful it is.
Anyway blah, blah, blah, moving on… I came home to an R2R request for ROA and a one-star review for EI. But I’m still buzzing. As I traverse this path of publishing I’ve learnt that there are more than a few bumps and I’m much better at dealing with negativity. This reviewer was very polite, considerate, and respectful so that might help too :p
So without getting too bogged down in my rambling I came to blog to tell you all that I was back, open to requests and questions, lol. Before I went away I was feeling weighed down, sluggish, not at my creative best but eureka! I feel revitalised and refreshed now! It looks like this break was just what the doctor ordered for my writing.
I got quite a few pages down, I’ll transcribe them tonight and check out the word count. I haven’t completed anything and maybe under other circumstances I could have achieved more but it’s back, the juices are flowing. My well of passion was running on low pre-break, now it’s filled to overflowing… let’s hope it lasts! 😀

Good luck on your adventures,

xSx

purple spark

 

Let’s take some to write about process. Ok, first thing is first, I need to put in a small disclaimer. All writers are different. While there may be similarities in working practice that does not mean that all writers work in the same way. I’m saying that to hopefully prevent a debate on my own practice! I don’t proclaim myself an expert, all I can do is share my thoughts.
So unless you’ve never heard of me before, or this is your first visit, I’ll say again Explicit Instruction is now out and available for purchase here. Writers can work on several projects simultaneously, priorities have to be set, but just because you’re writing/editing/publishing one novel doesn’t mean our imaginations shut down. It’s not as simple as, “That’s my latest novel out, what’s next?” I’m already toward the end of my next project!
To write about my whole process would lead to a novel sized blog, we’re obviously not going to do that. So we select one part, let’s start at the beginning.
The Spark.
Loosely there are two kinds of writer, the planner and the pantser. More often than not those methods will occasionally blend or overlap. But every story starts with an idea. Sometimes it’s a line of dialogue, sometimes it’s something we see in our day-to-day lives that has us smiling to ourselves in the most inappropriate of situations. But every story starts with an idea.
It’s not as simple to say that the idea creates the novel. It doesn’t. Not even close. There are ways that writers can encourage ideas. It can get to the point where you literally have to sit at your computer, snap your fingers and say, “Be creative – now!” There are times you have to force an idea but once you have it the process usually becomes more organic. But we’ll get to that another day.
If you’re a fledgling or aspiring writer it’s important to recognise these moments. The flicker of inspiration can be brief. But when it strikes you have to mentally acknowledge it. Writer’s block is a different thing. Motivation in the midst of writing is different. However, inspiration doesn’t strike with a lightening bolt or flash neon in front of your eyes. It doesn’t stand up and declare itself. Often The Spark is something intangible. I’ve experienced The Spark while standing in the street, I’ve had it while looking at art, I’ve had it in the middle of conversation about a completely unrelated issue. I’ve had it in the middle of the night while I’m “sleeping”.
So what does it look like? How do you recognise it? If it doesn’t declare itself how do we know if we’ve experienced it? Simple. Any thought that creates an emotional response can be channeled into our work.
You need an example? Ok, you’re walking down the street, late in the evening, and you see a bunch of teenagers walking down toward you in a gang. Maybe you’re wary, your sixth sense prickles, you experience fear. There, right there, you can use that emotion to create, maybe the heroine is walking down the street, enveloped by the gang and mugged. Inspiration. Or maybe the teenagers laugh and lark around until they see an elderly person struggling with their shopping, then the gang run over and help. Again, this could be used as inspiration, maybe in that gang one member stands out, maybe a relationship of trust develops and the teenager becomes like a surrogate child, maybe they end up inheriting the elderly person’s unknown millions. Maybe one of the teenagers falls over and is mocked, so maybe your hero and heroine meet when one falls at the feet of the other.
This is of course a very simplistic and general concept. But it’s about recognising that moment and finding a way to tailor it to lead to another moment in the plot and another. Whether you sit down and write immediately, or take notes and flesh out the story, every novel begins with an idea.
It doesn’t have to be something physical. Maybe it is merely a thought in your head, maybe a “what if…” scenario. It could come from anywhere, but you have to recognise it.
This is the boring bit. You’ll have heard it a million times before. But it’s impossible to stress this enough. If you have an idea, no matter how huge, or how tiny – write it down! Get yourself a good quality notebook, something durable enough that it will last a lifetime. You’ll go back to it. I promise you. You’ll never remember it. Write The Spark down. Put as much detail as you can, and if you can, spend some time with The Spark. In writing down The Spark you’ll find yourself having another idea, one leads to the next. No matter how disparate or uncertain it seems, write down everything that comes into your mind.
So always remember, there are ideas everywhere, and all it takes is experience. Find the idea, write it down, the rest is a dawdle… ok, so maybe it’s not. But without The Spark there is no novel. You need The Spark. Locate it. Record it. And you’re on your way…

Good luck on your adventures,

xSx

It’s out, Explicit Instruction is now available on Amazon. Please buy it and review it if you like. It’s published, I’ve told everyone I know, and I’ve conveyed that message through all of my online channels.
Now that is out the way there’s only one question left to answer. What’s next?
I’m in that limbo phase now. As a writer there are always ideas crowding out my thoughts. One character, a scene, a line of dialogue that my sub-conscious wants to prioritise. It takes discipline and perseverance to write and thus moving through the phases of writing requires focus.
The phase I’m in now I like to think of as my “resting” phase. That doesn’t mean I’m doing nothing, because I am. What it means is that I’m between the fury of projects. Tunnel vision is common amongst us writers… or indeed any of us creative types. I can be consumed by a draft, or an edit, or the peripheral elements required in publishing – cover design, blurb, description, etc. Right now I’m not consumed. Being consumed means living and breathing the work, getting up at the crack of dawn and writing until you can’t sit up anymore. But it doesn’t mean I’m any less enthralled.
My next project is going to be the Mistake Me Not sequel. It’s written but I have decided to rework a section so I’ll plough into the editing to get it restructured. I’ve started already and am well on my way to getting the first re-draft together. I’ve done that while sorting the necessary parts of Explicit Instruction out and so I almost haven’t realised how much I’ve done! :p
My head is buzzing with another idea that’s desperately trying to take hold, it’s trying to claw the MMN aside to gain my focus but I’m fighting against it. The MMN sequel was written long before Explicit Instruction took over and if I let this other idea consume me MMN will be deferred again.
But the sequel is written. Luckily I’m working with a cover designer already for the sequel so a September launch looks secure at this time… providing I don’t change my mind again!
I haven’t yet decided if I’m going to continue the Mistake novels after this sequel. I do have an outline written and researched for my favourite Stone man – can you guess which it is? 😛 It’s certainly not pressing. I might let this other idea crowd in. But I got a review for Explicit Instruction today on Amazon.com – not bad for launch day – that called for a sequel of Rushe and Flick’s story! Rushe is quite a hero! But it’s only launch day, we’ll see if it sticks. In the meantime…

Sneaky Snippet

‘My boyfriend’s a bodyguard,’ Lacie said. ‘Sorcha got it right. How many ways do you know how to kill a person?’
‘One’s enough,’ Ryder said. ‘But I believe in variety.’
Lacie leaned in close. ‘I know. I share a bed with you.’

Good luck on your adventures,

xSx